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Enrollment Site

Important Qualities To Have

Customer-service skills. Pharmacy technicians spend much of their time interacting with customers, so being helpful and polite is required of pharmacy technicians in a retail setting.

 

Detail oriented. Serious health problems can result from mistakes in filling prescriptions. Although the pharmacist is responsible for ensuring the safety of all medications dispensed, pharmacy technicians should pay attention to detail so that complications are avoided.

 

Listening skills. Pharmacy technicians must communicate clearly with pharmacists and doctors when taking prescription orders. When speaking with customers, technicians must listen carefully to understand customers’ needs and determine if they need to speak with a pharmacist.

 

Math skills. Pharmacy technicians need to have an understanding of the math concepts used in pharmacies when counting pills and compounding medications.

 

Organizational skills. Working as a pharmacy technician involves balancing a variety of responsibilities. Pharmacy technicians need good organizational skills to complete the work delegated by pharmacists while at the same time providing service to customers or patients.

Pharmacy Technician

Pharmacy technicians help pharmacists dispense prescription medication to customers or health professionals.

Class meets State Board requirements for Registered Pharmacy Technician Licensure. Study basic principles of pharmacology, pharmaceutical calculations, medical terminology, functions and duties of a pharmacy technician in both a retail and hospital pharmacy. Course includes hands-on training and experience in making I.V. solutions, piggybacks and aseptic techniques. A computer lab is utilized by students to input outpatient/inpatient data. Preparation for optional national certification exam is included.

 

Prerequisites: 18 years or older; U.S. high school diploma or equivalent (English version). Students must show proof of high school diploma or equivalent by the end of the class,  pre-algebra math skills; speak, read, write English, 9th grade reading level recommended.

 

Curriculum includes:

* Basic principles of pharmacology

* Medical terminology

* Pharmaceutical calculations

* Pharmacy theory

* Federal and California pharmacy law

* Safety considerations

* Pharmacy computer training

* Doctor and/or chart orders

* Functions and duties of different pharmacy settings

* Unit dose drug distribution

* Aseptic techniques/I.V. solutions

* Review for PTCB

Course Fee:  $1,595 Includes textbooks and all classroom materials.

 

Dates:  Aug. 13 - Jan. 19, plus 2 Saturdays per month

  

M, T, W, Th

5:30 pm - 8:30 pm

Room 503

Diment/George

Alternate Sat.

9:00 am - 12:30 pm

Room 503

Diment/George

 

Click HERE to register for this class

A background check may be required for externships, clinicals and licensing, certification or registration with the appropriate governing board.

Pharmacy technicians typically do the following:

  • Collect information needed to fill a prescription from customers or health professionals
  • Measure amounts of medication for prescriptions
  • Package and label prescriptions
  • Organize inventory and alert pharmacists to any shortages of medications or supplies
  • Accept payment for prescriptions and process insurance claims
  • Enter customer or patient information, including any prescriptions taken, into a computer system
  • Answer phone calls from customers
  • Arrange for customers to speak with pharmacists if customers have questions about medications or health matters

Pharmacy Technician

California 2016

     Low Median High
    25th percentile 50th percentile 75th percentile
         
  Annual Wages $31,561 $38,997 $48,949
         
  Hourly Wages $15.18 $18.75 $23.54

Work Environment

Pharmacy technicians work primarily in pharmacies, including those found in grocery and drug stores.  Some technicians work in hospitals or other healthcare facilities.  Pharmacy technicians spend most of the workday on their feet.

Work Schedule

Most pharmacy technicians work full time.  Pharmacies may be open at all hours.  Therefore, pharmacy technicians may have to work nights or weekends.

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2016-17 Edition

Employment Development Department/Labor Market Information Division, State of California, Occupational Employment Statistics, 2016

Job Duties

Pharmacy technicians typically do the following:

  • Collect information needed to fill a prescription from customers or health professionals
  • Measure amounts of medication for prescriptions
  • Package and label prescriptions
  • Organize inventory and alert pharmacists to any shortages of medications or supplies
  • Accept payment for prescriptions and process insurance claims
  • Enter customer or patient information, including any prescriptions taken, into a computer system
  • Answer phone calls from customers
  • Arrange for customers to speak with pharmacists if customers have questions about medications or health matters

Pharmacy technicians work under the supervision of pharmacists, who must review prescriptions before they are given to patients. In most states, technicians can compound or mix some medications and call physicians for prescription refill authorizations.  Technicians also may need to operate automated dispensing equipment when filling prescription orders.  Pharmacy technicians working in hospitals and other medical facilities prepare a greater variety of medications, such as intravenous medications.  They may make rounds in the hospital, giving medications to patients.