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Types of EMTs

The EMT-Basic (or EMT-I) represents the first component of the emergency medical technician system.  An EMT trained at this level cares for patients at the scene of an accident and while transporting patients by ambulance to the hospital under medical direction.  The EMT-Basic has the emergency skills to assess a patient’s condition and manage respiratory, cardiac, and trauma emergencies.  They help the emergency room staff do pre-admittance treatment and obtain medical histories.

The EMT- Advanced (or EMT-II) has more advanced training.  In addition to basic duties, they may insert intravenous catheters, administer intravenous glucose solutions or a limited number of drugs, and obtain blood samples for laboratory analysis. In certain emergencies, EMT-IIs may be approved to perform advanced life support procedures.

The EMT-Paramedics provide the most extensive pre-hospital care.  In addition to carrying out the procedures of the other levels,  Paramedics may administer drugs orally and intravenously, insert breathing-aid devices, use stomach suction equipment, interpret electrocardiograms, and use monitors and other complex equipment.

Important Qualities To Have

Compassion. EMTs and paramedics must be able to provide emotional support to patients in an emergency, especially patients who are in life-threatening situations or extreme mental distress.

Interpersonal skills. EMTs and paramedics usually work on teams and must be able to coordinate their activities closely with others in stressful situations.

Listening skills. EMTs and paramedics need to listen to patients to determine the extent of their injuries or illnesses.

Physical strength. EMTs and paramedics need to be physically fit. Their job requires a lot of bending, lifting, and kneeling.

Problem-solving skills. EMTs and paramedics must evaluate patients’ symptoms and administer appropriate treatments.

Speaking skills. EMTs and paramedics need to clearly explain procedures to patients, give orders, and relay information to others.

Emergency Medical Technician

Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics care for the sick or injured in emergency medical settings.  People’s lives often depend on the quick reaction and competent care provided by these workers.  EMTs and paramedics respond to emergency calls, performing medical services and transporting patients to medical facilities.

EMT Basic

Upon successful completion of coursework and final examinations, students will receive an EMT-1 Course Completion Certificate from Simi Institute and will be eligible to take the computerized National Registry Exam to be a California EMT-1. Live Scan (fingerprinting) and current immunizations are required prior to clinical experience.

Prerequisites:

Must be 18 years old or older with valid CPR card: “CPR for the Health Care Provider” card from the American Heart Association (AHA), or “CPR for the Professional Rescuer” card from the American Red Cross.

Note: A CPR class will be offered for "Basic" students needing to obtain a CPR card.  BLS-CPR certification must be obtained prior to clinicals and ride-alongs.

Course Fee: $1,175 Includes all textbooks, classroom materials, EMT polo shirt, clinicals, and ride-alongs.  Note:  Students MUST purchase their own required shoes and pants.

Classroom Dates:    Aug. 13 - Jan. 16, plus 3 Saturdays (TBD)

T, Th

6pm - 9:30 pm

Rm 508

 

Sat. 

8am - 4:30 pm

 

Rm 508

 

 

Ride Along and Clinicals:  Dec. 2 - Dec. 19

EMT Accelerated

Upon successful completion of coursework and final examinations, students will receive an EMT-1 Course Completion Certificate from Simi Institute and will be eligible to take the computerized National Registry Exam to be a California EMT-1. Live Scan (fingerprinting) and current immunizations are required prior to clinical experience.

Prerequisites:

Must be 18 years old or older with valid CPR card: “CPR for the Health Care Provider” card from the American Heart Association (AHA), or “CPR for the Professional Rescuer” card from the American Red Cross. Students in the Accelerated class must have a CPR card prior to the first class session.

Course Fee: $1,175 Includes EMT polo shirt, clinicals, ride-alongs and all textbooks.  Note:  Students MUST provide their own required shoes and pants.

Classroom Dates:  Oct. 14 - Nov. 9

M-F

8am - 6:00pm

Rm 508

 

Sat. 

8am - 6:00pm

Rm 508

 

Ride Along & Clinicals: 2 days, 12 hours each day, dates/times TBD

EMT Refresher

This four-day class meets the 32-hour classroom refresher requirement and the skills refresher requirement for the State of California and its Counties, as well as portions of the National Registry’s re-registration requirements for Emergency Medical Technician Basics. 

There may be additional requirements to be eligible for re-certification or to re-register if your certification has lapsed depending on the County and State of your certification.

Note: Skills completion certificates are only valid for 12 months or as allowed by the ruling regulatory agency or authority. All students must bring a copy of their current or most recent EMT certification card and a current Healthcare providers level CPR card to the class for the instructor.

Prerequisites:

Must be 18 years old or older with valid CPR card: “CPR for the Health Care Provider” card from the American Heart Association (AHA), or “CPR for the Professional Rescuer” card from the American Red Cross. 

Course Fee: $325 Additional fees for re-certification and re-registration may apply.

Classroom Dates:   Nov. 13, 14, 15 and 16

Th, Fri, Sat

8am - 6pm

Rm 508

 

 

EMT Skills Only

Students interested in skills testing only may enroll for EMT Skills Only which will take place on the last day of the refresher.  Skills practice will be at the discretion of the instructor.  If offered, it may be the same day prior to testing. Please check with the school for availability.

Prerequisites:

Students must bring a copy of their current or most recent EMT certification card and a current Healthcare Providers level CPR card to the class to give to the instructor.

Course Fee: $75

Classroom Dates:   Nov. 16

Sat. 

8am - 6pm

Rm 508

 

 

A background check may be required for externships, clinicals and licensing, certification or registration with the appropriate governing board.

Job Duties

EMTs and paramedics typically do the following:

  • Respond to 911 calls for emergency medical assistance, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or bandaging a wound
  • Assess a patient’s condition and determine a course of treatment
  • Provide first-aid treatment or life support care to sick or injured patients
  • Transport patients safely in an ambulance
  • Transfer patients to the emergency department of a hospital or other healthcare facility
  • Report their observations and treatment to physicians, nurses, or other healthcare facility staff
  • Document medical care given to patients
  • Inventory, replace, and clean supplies and equipment after use

When transporting a patient in an ambulance, one EMT or paramedic may drive the ambulance while another monitors the patient’s vital signs and gives additional care. Some paramedics work as part of a helicopter’s or an airplane’s flight crew to transport critically ill or injured patients to a hospital.  EMTs and paramedics also transport patients from one medical facility to another. Some patients may need to be transferred to a hospital that specializes in treating their particular injury or illness or to a facility that provides long-term care, such as a nursing home.  If a patient has a contagious disease, EMTs and paramedics decontaminate the interior of the ambulance and may need to report the case to the proper authorities.

Work Environment

About half of all EMTs and paramedics work in ambulance services.  About one third work in local government, excluding education and hospitals.  Others work in hospitals.  EMTs and paramedics work both indoors and outdoors, in all types of weather. Their work is physically strenuous and can be stressful, sometimes involving life-or-death situations.  EMTs and paramedics are required to do considerable kneeling, bending, and lifting while caring for and moving patients.  They may be exposed to contagious diseases and viruses, such as hepatitis B and HIV. Sometimes they can be injured by combative patients.  These risks can be reduced by following proper safety procedures, such as waiting for police to clear an area in violent situations or wearing gloves while working with a patient.

Work Schedule

Most paid EMTs and paramedics work full time.  About 1 in 3 work more than 40 hours per week.  Because EMTs and paramedics must be available to work in emergencies, they may work overnight and on weekends.  Some EMTs and paramedics work shifts in 12- or 48-hour increments.